UP next: Play Station 5(PS5)

We’ve begun to unveil more details behind the technical and hardware components that make PlayStation 5 such an innovative and powerful platform – the ultra-high-speed SSD, integrated custom I/O system, custom AMD GPU with ray tracing, and highly immersive 3D audio. With these capabilities, PS5™ will allow developers to maximize their creativity, building expansive worlds and new play experiences in the games they design.

An official PlayStation 5 event was held today at 9am Pacific Time(about 4pm in the UK) promising to go “under the hood” on the PS5’s specs and features, with the event livestreamed on the PlayStation Blog and YouTube.

The event was fronted by the PlayStation 5’s lead system architect Mark Cerny, and what he revealed can be watched directly below.

Following the official PS5 event video, is an in-brief rundown of what was revealed, followed by everything we already know about the PlayStation 5 console to date.

Sony has been uncharacteristically mum about the PlayStation 5, so when the company announced a digital event hosted by lead system architect Mark Cerny, expectations from fans were high. The hope was that we’d get to see the hardware, the controllers, or perhaps some games. What we got was a very technical presentation which may have gone over the heads of an average fan.

For those following recent events closely, this shouldn’t be a surprise — the presentation was meant to replace a developer-facing talk at GDC, which was postponed this year.

“Unfortunately, we had to cancel the talk that we had planned for GDC,” said Jim Ryan, president and CEO of Sony Interactive Entertainment. But fans didn’t know that going in, so they weren’t prepared for the dry nature of Mark Cerny’s chat.

To be fair to Sony, however, the lecture wasn’t devoid of information. We now know the PS5’s hardware specs, which in terms of raw numbers, appear to fall short of the Xbox Series X’s performance. You’ll be able to expand the PS5’s storage without proprietary drives. Cerny spoke highly of the PS5’s “3D audio” capabilities, which will reportedly make its aural experiences more realistic.

Cerny also assured people that Sony was trying its best to make the system quieter than the PS4, which could, at times, sound like a jet engine. Plus, some of the PS5’s aims, like better loading times, are certainly noteworthy. Fans should also be relieved to hear that the PS5 will be able to run most of the PS4’s top games at launch.

But the fact is, folks want to see the merchandise. They want to see games in action. This isn’t gelling with Sony’s approach right now, where the company is taking its time on rolling out new PS5 information, whether that’s hardware architecture or an extremely familiar logo.

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