Huawei says it is back to 90% capacity

The vast majority of Huawei’s workers are back to work following nationwide shutdowns implemented in response to the coronavirus spread in China country.

Huawei’s founder and CEO, Ren Zhengfei, has said to the Hong-Kong-based South China in this Morning Post that over 90% of the company’s 150,000 Chinese employees are back at their desks for proper office operation.

The Reg confirmed from Huawei if it had an official position to accompany the interview. We were revealed that none was available, but that Ren’s word can be considered gospel appropriately.

On we go then: in his interview this morning, Ren reported that Huawei resumed some of its operations from February 3, in line with the Chinese government’s decision to allow some critical industries to restart early. The company has also kept its supply chain intact by providing partners with protective gear to keep production going.

Ren said that no Huawei workers outside the Chinese province of Hubei have come down with COVID-19. He added that those who had been infected in Hubei were now recovering, but declined to give numbers.

Despite the virus outbreak, which has affected China and Europe, Huawei’s two biggest markets, Ren is optimistic about the future. He expects demand for its network gear to remain healthy as companies shift to remote working.

Though its CEO has hinted that without the support from the US companies, it may be toppled from a market leader’s position in 3 to 5 years, but he feels that US firms also need Huawei as a client to survive.

The Chinese company has been under severe pressure from the United States government for spying and alleged breach of US sanctions against Iran. The Trump administration newly passed a new law making it even more difficult for Huawei to work with the American technology companies.

“New technologies such as telehealth, online learning and remote working have shown to the world their usefulness in preventing the disease from spreading, as well as the importance of network connections,” Ren told the Post.

“Even when the West is feeling the mounting impact of the coronavirus, most of our projects can enhance their capabilities [during the outbreak]. There is a demand we need to meet,” he added.

Despite Ren’s positive outlook, he conceded that the company would lower its financial targets for the year in its financial results due later this month. But Ren is confident that Huawei will meet its new financial goals for the year. The company has previously said in a New Year’s message to employees that revenues rose last year by about 18 percent, to $122bn. ®over

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